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The custom has survived to some extent, and recent years have seen a resurgence in participation in the festival.Samhain was identified in Celtic literature as the beginning of the Celtic year and its description as "Celtic New Year" was popularised in 18th century literature From this usage in the Romanticist Celtic Revival, Samhain is still popularly regarded as the "Celtic New Year" in the contemporary Celtic cultures, both in the Six Celtic Nations and the diaspora.In the pre-Christian Gaelic world, cattle were the primary unit of currency and the center of agricultural and pastoral life.Samhain was the traditional time for slaughter, for preparing stores of meat and grain to last through the coming winter.The Gaulish calendar appears to have divided the year into two halves: the 'dark' half, beginning with the month ), the beginning of the lunar cycle which fell nearest to the midpoint between the autumnal equinox and the winter solstice.The lunations marking the middle of each half-year may also have been marked by specific festivals.

There is absolutely no evidence as to whether and how this time might have been observed in any pre-Christian culture.For instance, the contemporary calendars produced by the Celtic League begin and end at Samhain.It is important to remember that all of the written documents in places like Ireland and Wales date to a time after the arrival of Christianity in the 5th century.solstice and equinox, so the mid-summer festival would fall considerably later than summer solstice, around (Lughnasadh).It appears that the calendar was designed to align the lunations with the agricultural cycle of vegetation, and that the exact astronomical position of the Sun at that time was considered less important."end") is a festival on the end of the harvest season in Gaelic and Brythonic cultures, with aspects of a festival of the dead.